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Reverted indexes considered further

Gene and Jeremy have disputed two assertions about index reversion made in my previous post. The first is that (1,10) normalization strips term occurences of their IDF factor. The second is that the cutoff depth used in creating the reverted corpus sets an upper bound on reverted term DF.

Let me say immediately that [...] → Read More: Reverted indexes considered further

Facial recognition security to keep handset data safe

Reported By Stewart Mitchell in PCPro – Article from http://gsirak.ee.duth.gr/index.php/archives/163 Mobile phone security could come face-to-face with science fiction following a demonstration of biometric technology by scientists at the University … → Read More: Facial recognition security to keep handset data safe

Reverted indexes and true relevance feedback

I was fortunate enough at CIKM not only to meet the two bloggers cited in my thesis, namely Gene Golovchinsky and Jeremy Pickens of FXPAL (the latter now of Catalyst), but also to hear Jeremy present one of the more interesting papers of the conference, “Reverted Indexing for Feedback and Expansion” (co-authored with Gene and [...] → Read More: Reverted indexes and true relevance feedback

Assessor error in legal retrieval evaluation

Another year, another CIKM. This marks my first post-PhD publication (I finally submitted!), and it also marks a new sub-genre of retrieval evaluation for me: that of legal retrieval, or more specifically e-discovery. Discovery is a process in which party A produces for party B all documents in party A’s position that are [...] → Read More: Assessor error in legal retrieval evaluation

Google tablet strategy, or lack thereof

I wonder what Google is up to. They’ve announced that Froyo is not designed for tablets, and rumor has it that Honeycomb, the preferred Android tablet flavor (honeycomb a flavor? oh well), won’t ship until some time 2011. Of course there’s the also the possibility of Google Chrome tablets.
The message this sends to hardware vendors, [...] → Read More: Google tablet strategy, or lack thereof

How (and why) not to rank academics

The recently-launched Microsoft Academic Search, a product of Microsoft Research Asia, has made a bit of a splash as a potential competitor to Google Scholar. Although its coverage does not seem as detailed as Google Scholar quite yet, MS Academic Search has a number of additional features, such as author and conference pages, [...] → Read More: How (and why) not to rank academics

Evaluating keyword search in databases

I was recently invited to contribute a short article to a special issue of the IEEE Data Engineering Bulletin on keyword search in databases. Since database keyword search is not an area I have worked on previously, I decided the most worthwhile contribution I could make was to survey evaluation practice in the area, [...] → Read More: Evaluating keyword search in databases

Easter eggs in academic books

I’m currently reading Nonsampling Error in Surveys, by Judith Lessler and William Kalsbeek (Wiley, 1992) for a project I’m working on. It is, for the most part, an informative but necessarily rather dry treatment of statistical questions in survey design and interpretation. The segue at the end of Chapter 10 (p276), however, reads:

If [...] → Read More: Easter eggs in academic books

Come to EVIA, see California for free!

I’ve recently developed a morbid interest in the literature of financial disasters. In this vein, I’ve just finished reading Kindleberger et al., Manias, Panic, and Crashes: A History of Financial Crises — an interesting book, but remarkable for the confused way the writing is organized, with constant re-iterations, digressions, and non-sequiturs, as if [...] → Read More: Come to EVIA, see California for free!

Guilty pleasures

Bertrand Russell’s practically-minded grandmother used to disapprovingly refer to his studies of higher mathematics as “this life you are leading”. I have my own bookish degeneracy, namely, books. When at work I think with guilty pleasure of getting home, getting into my armchair, and reading. Besides reading, my preferred pastime is — [...] → Read More: Guilty pleasures