Rating

    No results.

Keeping “Free Law” Free

Who should pay to store and distribute the litigation records in US federal courts? The answer is surprisingly contentious – and, by all indications, getting more so. When the general public wants to read documents in US federal litigation, the standard method is PACER – the federal courts’ electronic record system. One might think this …

Continue reading “Keeping “Free Law” Free”

→ Read More: Keeping “Free Law” Free

Keeping “Free Law” Free

Who should pay to store and distribute the litigation records in US federal courts? The answer is surprisingly contentious – and, by all indications, getting more so. When the general public wants to read documents in US federal litigation, the standard method is PACER – the federal courts’ electronic record system. One might think this …

Continue reading “Keeping “Free Law” Free”

→ Read More: Keeping “Free Law” Free

Keeping “Free Law” Free

Who should pay to store and distribute the litigation records in US federal courts? The answer is surprisingly contentious – and, by all indications, getting more so. When the general public wants to read documents in US federal litigation, the standard method is PACER – the federal courts’ electronic record system. One might think this …

Continue reading “Keeping “Free Law” Free”

→ Read More: Keeping “Free Law” Free

Keeping “Free Law” Free

Who should pay to store and distribute the litigation records in US federal courts? The answer is surprisingly contentious – and, by all indications, getting more so. When the general public wants to read documents in US federal litigation, the standard method is PACER – the federal courts’ electronic record system. One might think this …

Continue reading “Keeping “Free Law” Free”

→ Read More: Keeping “Free Law” Free

Keeping “Free Law” Free

Who should pay to store and distribute the litigation records in US federal courts? The answer is surprisingly contentious – and, by all indications, getting more so. When the general public wants to read documents in US federal litigation, the standard method is PACER – the federal courts’ electronic record system. One might think this …

Continue reading “Keeping “Free Law” Free”

→ Read More: Keeping “Free Law” Free

Keeping “Free Law” Free

Who should pay to store and distribute the litigation records in US federal courts? The answer is surprisingly contentious – and, by all indications, getting more so. When the general public wants to read documents in US federal litigation, the standard method is PACER – the federal courts’ electronic record system. One might think this …

Continue reading “Keeping “Free Law” Free”

→ Read More: Keeping “Free Law” Free

Keeping “Free Law” Free

Who should pay to store and distribute the litigation records in US federal courts? The answer is surprisingly contentious – and, by all indications, getting more so. When the general public wants to read documents in US federal litigation, the standard method is PACER – the federal courts’ electronic record system. One might think this …

Continue reading “Keeping “Free Law” Free”

→ Read More: Keeping “Free Law” Free

Impact of OTA Bias and Consolidation on Consumers

Online travel agencies (“OTAs,” such as Expedia and Priceline) charge hotels fees that can reach 25% or even more. In today’s post, I assess the causes of these fees as well as the tactics OTAs have used to punish hotels that object — penalizing hotels that discount through other channels, while simultaneously boosting those that …

Continue reading “Impact of OTA Bias and Consolidation on Consumers”

→ Read More: Impact of OTA Bias and Consolidation on Consumers

Impact of OTA Bias and Consolidation on Consumers

Online travel agencies (“OTAs,” such as Expedia and Priceline) charge hotels fees that can reach 25% or even more. In today’s post, I assess the causes of these fees as well as the tactics OTAs have used to punish hotels that object — penalizing hotels that discount through other channels, while simultaneously boosting those that …

Continue reading “Impact of OTA Bias and Consolidation on Consumers”

→ Read More: Impact of OTA Bias and Consolidation on Consumers

Impact of OTA Bias and Consolidation on Consumers

Online travel agencies (“OTAs,” such as Expedia and Priceline) charge hotels fees that can reach 25% or even more. In today’s post, I assess the causes of these fees as well as the tactics OTAs have used to punish hotels that object — penalizing hotels that discount through other channels, while simultaneously boosting those that …

Continue reading “Impact of OTA Bias and Consolidation on Consumers”

→ Read More: Impact of OTA Bias and Consolidation on Consumers