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Invited talk at CATCH

Thanks to Frank Nack and Marc Bron, last week I had the opportunity to give a talk in The Netherlands at a NWO CATCH event organized by BRIDGE. NWO is the Dutch national research organization; BRIDGE is a project that explores access to television archives; and CATCH stands for Continuous Access To Cultural Heritage, which is [...] → Read More: Invited talk at CATCH

History matters

Exploratory search is an uncertain endeavor. Quite often, people don’t know exactly how to express their information need, and that need may evolve over time as information is discovered and understood. This is not news. When people search for information, they often run multiple queries to get at different aspects of the information need, to [...] → Read More: History matters

CFP: HCIR 2012 Symposium

We are happy to announce that the 2012 Human-Computer Information Retrieval Symposium (HCIR 2012) will be held in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 4 – 5, 2012. The HCIR series of workshops has provided a venue for discussion of ongoing research on a range of topics related to interactive information retrieval, including interaction techniques, evaluation, models and algorithms for [...] → Read More: CFP: HCIR 2012 Symposium

HCIR intern, 2012 edition

Update: This intern slot has been filled. It’s intern season again! I am looking for a PhD student well-versed in persuasive/affective computing/captology literature to participate in a research project related to improving the quality of interaction in information seeking environments. The goal of the project is to explore how to increase people’s engagement with systems while performing [...] → Read More: HCIR intern, 2012 edition

A quick study of Scholar-ly Citation

Google recently unveiled Citations, its extension to Google Scholar that helps people to organize the papers and patents they wrote and to keep track of citations to them. You can edit metadata that wasn’t parsed correctly, merge or split references, connect to co-authors’ citation pages, etc. Cool stuff. When it comes to using this tool [...] → Read More: A quick study of Scholar-ly Citation

Looking for volunteers for collaborative search study

We are about to deploy an experimental system for searching through CiteSeer data. The system, Querium, is designed to support collaborative, session-based search. This means that it will keep track of your searches, help you make sense of what you’ve already seen, and help you to collaborate with your colleagues. The short video shown below [...] → Read More: Looking for volunteers for collaborative search study

Revealing details

Thanks to Mor Namaan, I came across an interesting blog post by Justin O’Beirne that analyzed the graphic design of several different maps — Google, Bing, and Yahoo — to show why Google maps tend appear easier to read and to use. The gist of the analysis is that legibility is improved through a number [...] → Read More: Revealing details

MyUnity, explained

We correct some of the misrepresentations of the technology that have crept into media accounts of MyUnity. → Read More: MyUnity, explained

Too much variety?

Tweetdeck recently published an interesting summary of their testing efforts for a Twitter client for Android. The short post enumerates the set of hardware and operating system versions they had to contend with in testing their software. I counted about 250 different devices and over 100 versions of the OS in the Tweetdeck charts in a [...] → Read More: Too much variety?

the problem with paper

A writer for the TC blog, Erick Schonfeld, recently posted a description of an encounter he had with a Stanford student at a drug store trying to recruit users to experiment with a paper prototype. The prototype and study were being carried out as a requirement for an HCI course the student is taking. The [...] → Read More: the problem with paper