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AirAuth: Authentication through In-Air Gestures Instead of Passwords

At the CHI 2014 conference, we demonstrated a new prototype authentication system, AirAuth, that explores the use of in-air gestures for authentication purposes as an alternative to password-based entry. Previous work has shown that passwords or PINs as an authentication mechanism have usability issues that ultimately lead to a compromise in security. For instance, as […] → Read More: AirAuth: Authentication through In-Air Gestures Instead of Passwords

Improving the Expressiveness of Touch Input

Touch input is now the preferred input method on mobile devices such as smartphones or tablets. Touch is also gaining traction in the desktop segment and is also common for interaction with large table or wall-based displays. At present, the majority of touch displays can detect solely the touch location of a user input. Some […] → Read More: Improving the Expressiveness of Touch Input

Looking ahead

It is reasonably well-known that people who examine search results often don’t go past the first few hits, perhaps stopping at the “fold” or at the end of the first page. It’s a habit we’ve acquired due to high-quality results to precision-oriented information needs. Google has trained us well. But this habit may not always […] → Read More: Looking ahead

In Defense of the Skeuomorph, or Maybe Not…

Jony Ive is a fantastic designer. As a rule, his vision for a device sets the trend for that entire class of devices. Apparently, Jony Ive hates skeuomorphic design elements. Skeuomorphs are those sometimes corny bits of realism some designers add to user interfaces. These design elements reference an application’s analog embodiment. Apple’s desktop and mobile interfaces […] → Read More: In Defense of the Skeuomorph, or Maybe Not…

Invited talk at CATCH

Thanks to Frank Nack and Marc Bron, last week I had the opportunity to give a talk in The Netherlands at a NWO CATCH event organized by BRIDGE. NWO is the Dutch national research organization; BRIDGE is a project that explores access to television archives; and CATCH stands for Continuous Access To Cultural Heritage, which is [...] → Read More: Invited talk at CATCH

History matters

Exploratory search is an uncertain endeavor. Quite often, people don’t know exactly how to express their information need, and that need may evolve over time as information is discovered and understood. This is not news. When people search for information, they often run multiple queries to get at different aspects of the information need, to [...] → Read More: History matters

CFP: HCIR 2012 Symposium

We are happy to announce that the 2012 Human-Computer Information Retrieval Symposium (HCIR 2012) will be held in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 4 – 5, 2012. The HCIR series of workshops has provided a venue for discussion of ongoing research on a range of topics related to interactive information retrieval, including interaction techniques, evaluation, models and algorithms for [...] → Read More: CFP: HCIR 2012 Symposium

HCIR intern, 2012 edition

Update: This intern slot has been filled. It’s intern season again! I am looking for a PhD student well-versed in persuasive/affective computing/captology literature to participate in a research project related to improving the quality of interaction in information seeking environments. The goal of the project is to explore how to increase people’s engagement with systems while performing [...] → Read More: HCIR intern, 2012 edition

A quick study of Scholar-ly Citation

Google recently unveiled Citations, its extension to Google Scholar that helps people to organize the papers and patents they wrote and to keep track of citations to them. You can edit metadata that wasn’t parsed correctly, merge or split references, connect to co-authors’ citation pages, etc. Cool stuff. When it comes to using this tool [...] → Read More: A quick study of Scholar-ly Citation

Looking for volunteers for collaborative search study

We are about to deploy an experimental system for searching through CiteSeer data. The system, Querium, is designed to support collaborative, session-based search. This means that it will keep track of your searches, help you make sense of what you’ve already seen, and help you to collaborate with your colleagues. The short video shown below [...] → Read More: Looking for volunteers for collaborative search study