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SearchPanel: supporting exploratory search in regular search engines

People often use more than one query when searching for information. We revisit search results to re-find information and build an understanding of our search need through iterative explorations of query formulation. Unfortunately, these tasks are not well supported by search interfaces and web browsers. The only indication of our search process we get is […] → Read More: SearchPanel: supporting exploratory search in regular search engines

Looking ahead

It is reasonably well-known that people who examine search results often don’t go past the first few hits, perhaps stopping at the “fold” or at the end of the first page. It’s a habit we’ve acquired due to high-quality results to precision-oriented information needs. Google has trained us well. But this habit may not always […] → Read More: Looking ahead

HCIR 2013 CFP

It’s that time of the year again, time to solicit your latest and greatest HCIR ideas in written and poster form. We are happy to announce that this year’s Human-Computer Information Retrieval Symposium (HCIR 2013) will be held on October 3 and 4 in Vancouver, BC. Building on last year’s meeting, we will have both […] → Read More: HCIR 2013 CFP

HCIR site gets publication page

Over the past six years of the HCIR series of meetings, we’ve accumulated a number of publications. We’ve had a series of reports about the meetings, papers published in the ACM Digital Library, and an up-coming Special Issue of IP&M. In the run-up to this year’s event (stay tuned!), I decided it might be useful [...] → Read More: HCIR site gets publication page

HCIR 2012 keynote

Summary of Marti Hearst’s keynote talk at HCIR 2012 → Read More: HCIR 2012 keynote

History matters

Exploratory search is an uncertain endeavor. Quite often, people don’t know exactly how to express their information need, and that need may evolve over time as information is discovered and understood. This is not news. When people search for information, they often run multiple queries to get at different aspects of the information need, to [...] → Read More: History matters

CFP: HCIR 2012 Symposium

We are happy to announce that the 2012 Human-Computer Information Retrieval Symposium (HCIR 2012) will be held in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 4 – 5, 2012. The HCIR series of workshops has provided a venue for discussion of ongoing research on a range of topics related to interactive information retrieval, including interaction techniques, evaluation, models and algorithms for [...] → Read More: CFP: HCIR 2012 Symposium

HCIR intern, 2012 edition

Update: This intern slot has been filled. It’s intern season again! I am looking for a PhD student well-versed in persuasive/affective computing/captology literature to participate in a research project related to improving the quality of interaction in information seeking environments. The goal of the project is to explore how to increase people’s engagement with systems while performing [...] → Read More: HCIR intern, 2012 edition

Collaborative search on the rise?

I am seeing an interesting not-quite-yet-a-trend on the emergence of collaborative search tools. I am not talking about research tools such as SearchTogether or Coagmento, but of real companies started for the purpose of putting out a search tool that supports explicit collaboration. The two recent entries in this category of which I am aware are [...] → Read More: Collaborative search on the rise?

A quick study of Scholar-ly Citation

Google recently unveiled Citations, its extension to Google Scholar that helps people to organize the papers and patents they wrote and to keep track of citations to them. You can edit metadata that wasn’t parsed correctly, merge or split references, connect to co-authors’ citation pages, etc. Cool stuff. When it comes to using this tool [...] → Read More: A quick study of Scholar-ly Citation

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