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Are You Hitched?

Let me preface this post by saying that this is my personal blog, and that my opinions here are not necessarily those of my employer. With that out of the way, I love the premise of Hitch.me: a dating site for professionals based on LinkedIn. I won’t confirm or deny the number of my colleagues […] → Read More: Are You Hitched?

Are You Hitched?

Let me preface this post by saying that this is my personal blog, and that my opinions here are not necessarily those of my employer. With that out of the way, I love the premise of Hitch.me: a dating site for professionals based on LinkedIn. I won’t confirm or deny the number of my colleagues […] → Read More: Are You Hitched?

The faster-than-fast Fourier transform

Article from MITNews For a large range of practically useful cases, MIT researchers find a way to increase the speed of one of the most important algorithms in the information sciences. The Fourier transform is one of the most fundamental concepts in t… → Read More: The faster-than-fast Fourier transform

WIAMIS 2012: The 13th International Workshop on Image Analysis for Multimedia Interactive Services 23rd – 25th May 2012, Dublin City University, Ireland

The International Workshop on Image Analysis for Multimedia Interactive Services is one of the main international events for the presentation and discussion of the latest technological advances in interactive multimedia services. The objective of the w… → Read More: WIAMIS 2012: The 13th International Workshop on Image Analysis for Multimedia Interactive Services 23rd – 25th May 2012, Dublin City University, Ireland

Guided Exploration = Faceted Search, Backwards

Information Scent In the early 1990s, PARC researchers Peter Pirolli and Stuart Card developed the theory of information scent (more generally, information foraging) to evaluate user interfaces in terms of how well users can predict which paths will lead them to useful information. Like many HCIR researchers and practitioners, I’ve found this model to be […] → Read More: Guided Exploration = Faceted Search, Backwards

Guided Exploration = Faceted Search, Backwards

Information Scent In the early 1990s, PARC researchers Peter Pirolli and Stuart Card developed the theory of information scent (more generally, information foraging) to evaluate user interfaces in terms of how well users can predict which paths will lead them to useful information. Like many HCIR researchers and practitioners, I’ve found this model to be […] → Read More: Guided Exploration = Faceted Search, Backwards

Guided Exploration = Faceted Search, Backwards

Information Scent In the early 1990s, PARC researchers Peter Pirolli and Stuart Card developed the theory of information scent (more generally, information foraging) to evaluate user interfaces in terms of how well users can predict which paths will lead them to useful information. Like many HCIR researchers and practitioners, I’ve found this model to be […] → Read More: Guided Exploration = Faceted Search, Backwards

Guided Exploration = Faceted Search, Backwards

Information Scent In the early 1990s, PARC researchers Peter Pirolli and Stuart Card developed the theory of information scent (more generally, information foraging) to evaluate user interfaces in terms of how well users can predict which paths will lead them to useful information. Like many HCIR researchers and practitioners, I’ve found this model to be […] → Read More: Guided Exploration = Faceted Search, Backwards

Guided Exploration = Faceted Search, Backwards

Information Scent In the early 1990s, PARC researchers Peter Pirolli and Stuart Card developed the theory of information scent (more generally, information foraging) to evaluate user interfaces in terms of how well users can predict which paths will lead them to useful information. Like many HCIR researchers and practitioners, I’ve found this model to be […] → Read More: Guided Exploration = Faceted Search, Backwards

Guided Exploration = Faceted Search, Backwards

Information Scent In the early 1990s, PARC researchers Peter Pirolli and Stuart Card developed the theory of information scent (more generally, information foraging) to evaluate user interfaces in terms of how well users can predict which paths will lead them to useful information. Like many HCIR researchers and practitioners, I’ve found this model to be […] → Read More: Guided Exploration = Faceted Search, Backwards